3 Probiotic-Packed Foods We Love – Dr. Thornburg

3 Probiotic-Packed Foods We Love

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Three probiotic foods we love

It’s highly probable that you have some awareness of probiotics with all the gut talk currently flooding health talks, journals, and blogs. If not, here’s a quick snapshot: Probiotics are the good bacteria in our gut that aid in breaking down our foods.

The health benefits of probiotics are truly worthy of continued mass discussion as it combats nasty bacteria while releasing a profusion of life-enriching nutrients and system support. It is why taking care of our gut should transcend periodic webinars and articles.

Incorporating practical ways in your daily life to promote the probiotic population in your gut is easier done than said.  Here are the three probiotic-packed foods we love to help you get started.

KOMBUCHA+YOGURT

Some foods organically contain probiotics, and others receive a boost through the sophisticated process known as fermentation. The fusion of kombucha (fermented sweet tea) and yogurt (fermented milk) tops our list of preferred probiotic foods we recommend.

On their own, kombucha and yogurt are two, effective “good guy bacteria”-packed foods that can improve your health. Together, they are a dynamic source for wellness. Tip: Most brands of yogurt have been pasteurized, killing their probiotic properties. Look for brands labeled ‘live yogurt’ or ‘cultured yogurt’.

KIMCHI

The next time you go to an Asian restaurant be on the lookout for this scrumptious probiotic-packed side! Kimchi is a popular Korean dish made from cabbage and other veggies, lightly sprinkled with salt and other spices. Its simple ingredients make it easy to make at home on your own.

Packed with vitamins A and C, and minerals such as magnesium, calcium and selenium, kimchi is a probiotic rockstar in helping maintain optimal gut health. You can eat it in different ways: mixed with soups, as a burger topping, scrambled with eggs, or over a bed of rice.

SAUERKRAUT

Probiotic-rich sauerkraut is a superfood due in large part to the gut-supporting lactic acid bacteria created during the fermentation process. Similar to kimchi, it’s mainly a combination of cabbage and salt.

Many people choose to spread this sour and salty treat on top of sausages or use it as a side dish. As one of the oldest traditional foods, sauerkraut is rich in vitamins and fiber and should be bought unpasteurized or made at home to retain its probiotic power.

 

Whether you consume probiotics in food or as a supplement, increasing your fermented food intake will benefit your body and overall health. We do, however, recommend introducing these superfoods slowly to allow your system to adjust. Let us know in the comments below if you have or will try any of these!

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